Posts Tagged Plastics

The GoodOnYa Bar: organic bar at 25% off

Buy at 25% off here: www.ecobold.com The GoodOnYa Bar is a gluten free organic energy bar that is great for breakfast and as a snack before/after the gym or exercising. Their new gluten free version is delicious and you’ll get fulfilled just by eating half of one bar. It’s one of the best organic energy bars I’ve seen simply because of their ingredients. Founded by the principle that “every ingredient matters” GoodOnYa bars have nothing less than a great taste and great ingredients list. Our of their three different bars, the one with the least amount of raw ingredients is 55% on the peanut butter chocolate bar. The nutritional information is also great, an average of 7 grams of fiber, 8 grams of protein and 22 grams of carbs. Every single ingredient of this organic energy bar is organic, they’re so good and go above and beyond in so many ways that they even won the Ecobold Awards for best food company. What also helped them win is their commitment to the planet and its people. GoodOnYa is a Green Certified Business, they’ve banned plastics from the company, they recycle at work, they use local vendors as often as possible and are members of several environmental foundations and non-GMO associations. There are three flavors to choose from: breakfast, peanut butter and peanut butter dark chocolate. Make sure to place a note under notes to seller Don’t forget to get it at our discount price of 25% off your order! Highlights: – Soy-free – No fillers – Dairy-free – GMO-free

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Paper, Packaging, Energy, Waste, Recycling, Sustainability – future of printed media, newspapers, magazines, paperless office, logistics, retail, distribution – conference keynote speaker Patrick Dixon

Future trends in paper and packaging industry- entire 30 minute presentation. www.globalchange.com Paper and packaging industry. Future of sustainable packaging, paper, logistics. Demographics, digital impact, distribution and destiny. Demographics 1 billion new consumers. Emerging markets growth and demand for commodities resources / paper and cardboard. Growth of emerging middle class and paper products growth. Oil price rises, growing populations, food supply, growth of meat eaters …

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Saving Money and the Environment


Saving Money and the Environment

With the current economic problems, hopefully more people are interested in saving money and recycling. Businesses are always interested in keeping the customers they have and getting new ones.

The cost of fuel has been big in the news for years but, when compared to plastics, it’s a small percentage of petrochemical use. Saving on the use of petrochemicals for making plastics can extend the timeframe before peak oil and lower the price of fuels.

Most grocery stores offer a five cent per bag discount if you bring in your bags. You can do that in a variety of ways. One is by taking the old plastic bags back and another is using cloth bags, which can often be purchased at the store. Usually, grocers will sell cloth bags with their advertising on them at their cost, which is cheaper than an equivalent type bag can be purchased elsewhere. By doing that, the grocer gets their investment back and advertisement as well. If your grocer doesn’t have a program of that type, tell them about the advertising value and mention that you take your bags everywhere, including their competitor’s store.

If you don’t want to spend the money on cloth bags, reuse your old plastic ones. Plastic bags aren’t as durable as cloth and it’s a good practice to double bag when using a plastic bag more than once or twice.

We’ve found cloth bags to be a good investment. Most of our bags are almost twenty years old. If we save two cents a bag and buy ten bags of groceries, and do that five times a month, we’ve saved a dollar a month. That doesn’t sound like much but our cloth bags paid for themselves the first year, with the last eighteen plus years being pure savings.

Tying the bags off keeps the goods inside from spilling all over the trunk on the way home. But, tying them off presents another problem. Getting them untied, especially the plastic bags, can be difficult if not impossible. Most people consider it not worth the effort and rip them apart. There’s a simple answer to that problem. Since a picture is worth a thousand words, I have a brief slide show that explains the process. Once the bags are tied in the manner I show in the pictures, they untie easily and can be used over and over.

Since a picture is worth a thousand words, I have put together a slide show tutorial. You can access the slide show by going to the URL in the resource box.

Helpful health, how-to, travel and automotive information can be accessed by going to http://www.newliferoadmap.com

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Saving Money and the Environment


Saving Money and the Environment

With the current economic problems, hopefully more people are interested in saving money and recycling. Businesses are always interested in keeping the customers they have and getting new ones.

The cost of fuel has been big in the news for years but, when compared to plastics, it’s a small percentage of petrochemical use. Saving on the use of petrochemicals for making plastics can extend the timeframe before peak oil and lower the price of fuels.

Most grocery stores offer a five cent per bag discount if you bring in your bags. You can do that in a variety of ways. One is by taking the old plastic bags back and another is using cloth bags, which can often be purchased at the store. Usually, grocers will sell cloth bags with their advertising on them at their cost, which is cheaper than an equivalent type bag can be purchased elsewhere. By doing that, the grocer gets their investment back and advertisement as well. If your grocer doesn’t have a program of that type, tell them about the advertising value and mention that you take your bags everywhere, including their competitor’s store.

If you don’t want to spend the money on cloth bags, reuse your old plastic ones. Plastic bags aren’t as durable as cloth and it’s a good practice to double bag when using a plastic bag more than once or twice.

We’ve found cloth bags to be a good investment. Most of our bags are almost twenty years old. If we save two cents a bag and buy ten bags of groceries, and do that five times a month, we’ve saved a dollar a month. That doesn’t sound like much but our cloth bags paid for themselves the first year, with the last eighteen plus years being pure savings.

Tying the bags off keeps the goods inside from spilling all over the trunk on the way home. But, tying them off presents another problem. Getting them untied, especially the plastic bags, can be difficult if not impossible. Most people consider it not worth the effort and rip them apart. There’s a simple answer to that problem. Since a picture is worth a thousand words, I have a brief slide show that explains the process. Once the bags are tied in the manner I show in the pictures, they untie easily and can be used over and over.

Since a picture is worth a thousand words, I have put together a slide show tutorial. You can access the slide show by going to the URL in the resource box.

Helpful health, how-to, travel and automotive information can be accessed by going to http://www.newliferoadmap.com

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