Posts Tagged Nutrients

Begin Living A Greener Life With An Organic Garden

For people who are old enough to remember, leading a green life used to be the norm. Almost everyone would grow their own gardens or purchase their produce from the store; of course, this was before the huge fast food rage. Many years ago, mostly everyone maintained at least an average size garden, and a lot of small communities also had small farmers markets. There wasn’t the need to scrutinize labels to see what the product contained. Gardening used to be a normal practice in everyone’s lives; this is how parents fed their kids and keep the extra foods for wintertime. People did not believe in squandering food many, many years ago so any food not consumed was put back to the garden and integrated with the soil.

People did not apply chemical substances, and they fertilized their gardens in a natural manner. A normal garden produced enough delicious vegetables to feed every member of the family, and some of the neighbours. That was a time when people really knew their neighbors, and sharing food with each other was something that people did. I am certain you have heard of pesticides and chemical based fertilizers; well, many, many years ago, ages ago, not too long ago, some time ago people had never even heard of these terms. While these pesticides and chemicals were thought to assist in growing food, what they really did was begin harming the environment.

We will likely never realize how many of the health issues of today are set off by the chemicals in the ground and the absence of nutrients in our foods. No one ever gives any thought to the health conditions caused by these chemicals until they afflict someone in their family. As poor health is becoming typical for most of the population, more individuals are becoming worried about what they put into their bodies. Veggies have a lot more vitamins and nutrients in them when they are grown in an organic manner.

Living green is something that many people are now considering, and maybe it is time for you to think about it also. If you simply look at the health problems in the world these days, you may realize that it is time for a change. Conventional medicine has stopped working so it could be time to try alternative health care. In the issue of food, it is time to make the switch organic. Green living with organic gardening can be a means to cure ourselves, and help mend the Earth.

If a lot more people began their own organic garden, the amount of toxic substances being dumped in to the ground each year would be lowered greatly. Manure and other eco friendly plant foods must be utilized as opposed to toxic substances. The dead leaves, grass trimmings and kitchen leftovers will keep the soil full of necessary nutrients. By not using chemical fertilizers, you can be secure in the fact that you are not causing harm to wildlife or the health of your family. As well, the food produced will be healthy for consumption. Also, by having your own organic garden, you will be helping to reduce the detrimental effects on the earth associated with chemical substances.

You should keep your distance from the affected area if you choose to use chemical pesticides. Now if breathing in these poisonous fumes are dangerous to your health, what about the chemical substances which are contained in the food that you eat? If you choose not to make use of these insidious chemical pesticides, you can work in the garden whenever you want without having to avoid the area for any certain amounts of time. Numerous organic gardeners have their gardens close to their dwellings, which is one important reason not to use chemicals. By having your own organic garden, you can be sure you’re consuming nutritious foods and saving the environment at the same time.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment

Takes Care of Two Things at Once: Composting Food Waste


Takes Care of Two Things at Once: Composting Food Waste

Years ago my dad taught me the benefits of composting food waste. It had nothing to do with any type of “green” movement or being environmentally friendly, no, it had everything to do with reintroducing nutrients back into the soil.

Here is what he taught me then and it still holds true today. By burying your food waste and kitchen scraps (no steak bones though), you are providing a quality food source for the creatures that live in your soil. From micro organisms and those creatures that the human eye can not see, up to worms, which of course we do see.

See, what happens is these creatures eat the food (and of course each other) and then finally the worms eat basically everything and their castings (worm poop) create the best nutrients your soil could ever have. By continually supplying your garden soil with food waste you are feeding the earthly creatures and they reward you with healthy soil. Now where can you get a trade off like that!

Ok so here is how you do it. Get yourself a fairly large Tupperware bowl. One large enough to hold at least a week’s worth of food scraps. Then after each meal dump everything and anything into that bowl. Just do not put steak bones in there, they wont biodegrade or be eaten by the worms. Banana peels, apple peels, coffee grinds, fish, vegetable scraps, egg shells and basically anything you don’t eat, all qualifies.

When your Tupperware bowl gets full, take it out to your garden and dig a hole about a foot to two feet deep and then dump the food scraps into the hole. Fill in the hole with the dirt and mark the spot with a stick or something else so that you do not dig up that area again for another three months. You need to give those little rascals some time to eat it all.

Now you simply repeat this process as the Tupperware bowl gets full. If you find that you live in colder climates where the ground may freeze for lengthy periods of time, then consider starting a warm box to recycle your food scraps. That goes beyond the scope of this article but I am sure if you Googled the search term “vermicompost” you will get all the information you will ever need.

So what are the two things I was talking about earlier? Well obviously the first is you are adding nutrients to your soil through composting food waste. The second is by composting your food waste you are limiting the amount of garbage that ends up in a landfill. The average four person house hold creates about 8 pounds of food waste per week. If every family in America followed this process we would eliminate nearly one billion pounds of food waste garbage a year. Now that is a lot of trash!

Do your part and compost your food waste. The worms in your garden will love you for it and so will everyone else in the environment.

About the Author
Bruce Tucker is a contributing writer to Mike’s How-To Blog, a blog that covers a wide variety of topics and how to do them. You can also follow him on Twitter.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Have a Green New Year!

Get the reusable bottles here: www.ecobold.com How to green your New Year? In 2011 you’ll see how easy it is to go green, here I give you three basic tips and every one of them is fairly easy to implement. Some are more expensive than others, but all tips are for all budgets! The first tip is to start shopping at your local farmers’ market, it’s not only much healthier for you but also your food has traveled only a few miles to get to you rather than thousands of miles coming from the other side of the planet. Also, when your fruits and veggies have to travel that much, they are harvested unripe, which means that most nutrients haven’t even formed yet, quite different from your farmers’ market fruits and veggies that are usually harvested the day before and are full of nutrients that we need. The second tip is to get a reusable water bottle, reusable shopping bag and reusable coffee mug. Most coffee shops will give you a .10 to .25 cents discount when you bring your own reusable mug, which can add up to several dollars throughout the year. Your own reusable bag because you can take hundreds of plastic bags from going to landfills, it’s also becoming a trend for cities to forbid plastic bags (such as San Francisco), plus some places are starting to charge for plastic bags! The third tip is to spend some money on yourself this year. Try to get at least one thing that’s significant enough that can make a big impact in your body. For example it could be an organic mattress

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

4 Comments

The Classroom of Mobile Technology


Takes Care of Two Things at Once: Composting Food Waste

Years ago my dad taught me the benefits of composting food waste. It had nothing to do with any type of “green” movement or being environmentally friendly, no, it had everything to do with reintroducing nutrients back into the soil.

Here is what he taught me then and it still holds true today. By burying your food waste and kitchen scraps (no steak bones though), you are providing a quality food source for the creatures that live in your soil. From micro organisms and those creatures that the human eye can not see, up to worms, which of course we do see.

See, what happens is these creatures eat the food (and of course each other) and then finally the worms eat basically everything and their castings (worm poop) create the best nutrients your soil could ever have. By continually supplying your garden soil with food waste you are feeding the earthly creatures and they reward you with healthy soil. Now where can you get a trade off like that!

Ok so here is how you do it. Get yourself a fairly large Tupperware bowl. One large enough to hold at least a week’s worth of food scraps. Then after each meal dump everything and anything into that bowl. Just do not put steak bones in there, they wont biodegrade or be eaten by the worms. Banana peels, apple peels, coffee grinds, fish, vegetable scraps, egg shells and basically anything you don’t eat, all qualifies.

When your Tupperware bowl gets full, take it out to your garden and dig a hole about a foot to two feet deep and then dump the food scraps into the hole. Fill in the hole with the dirt and mark the spot with a stick or something else so that you do not dig up that area again for another three months. You need to give those little rascals some time to eat it all.

Now you simply repeat this process as the Tupperware bowl gets full. If you find that you live in colder climates where the ground may freeze for lengthy periods of time, then consider starting a warm box to recycle your food scraps. That goes beyond the scope of this article but I am sure if you Googled the search term “vermicompost” you will get all the information you will ever need.

So what are the two things I was talking about earlier? Well obviously the first is you are adding nutrients to your soil through composting food waste. The second is by composting your food waste you are limiting the amount of garbage that ends up in a landfill. The average four person house hold creates about 8 pounds of food waste per week. If every family in America followed this process we would eliminate nearly one billion pounds of food waste garbage a year. Now that is a lot of trash!

Do your part and compost your food waste. The worms in your garden will love you for it and so will everyone else in the environment.

About the Author
Bruce Tucker is a contributing writer to Mike’s How-To Blog, a blog that covers a wide variety of topics and how to do them. You can also follow him on Twitter.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Hydroponics is Clean Gardening

Raising plants without the use of dirt is called hydroponics. Usually, hydroponic gardening involves the use of water as a growth medium. Certainly, there are more scientifically exact explanations. But for the home gardener, that’s likely all you have to know.

Many individuals may question how hydroponic gardening is possible. Many folks are certain that soil is compulsory for the progression of a plant. It’s a source of water, energy, support and nutrients. These are all essential if you want the plant to flourish. But these ingredients are able to be obtained from other sources also.

Water is an absolute essential for any plant life. However they don’t need to get it from soil. You’ll find that a lot of plants grow naturally in unwelcoming surroundings including sand and gravel, or even suspended on top of the water.

Plants also require energy in the form of sunshine and heat. But sun warmed soil is not the sole supply of energy. Sunlight works directly on foliage the same way it does for plants in the soil. Photosynthesis, important to a plant’s welfare, will occur just as long as the upper region of the plant gets ample light. Several plants do well even with no light at all. But they still require energy to fuel their normal growth cycles.

Most universally grown plants have need of some kind of support to hold them up. Most frequently, this is achieved by planting them in the ground. That’s how come the roots of a plant proliferate, and its stem is able to withstand powerful winds. But other supporting means can accomplish the identical effect. For instance, twine interwoven on a supporting framework of popsicle sticks fastened to the top of a tumbler will work just fine.

Nutrients are another of the vital components for a thriving plant. This consists of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and an assortment of trace elements. In a natural setting, the plant will absorb these nutrients from the soil around it. However they can also acquire these vital nutrients in other ways.

Immersing the plant’s roots in water that holds a liquid nutrient mixture is a widespread method. There are procedures that utilize a hydroponics grow tent to preserve moisture. The roots are sprayed regularly with a nutrient blend that saturates them thoroughly. This practice has similarities to aeroponics, another system of soil-less gardening.

Attractive and thriving plants can result from hydroponics. There are a lot of types of plants that can prosper above ground. Just ensure you provide for their requirements.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments