80 WATT SOLAR PANEL Grid Tie Inverter Direct Monocrystaline


SOLAR PANELS

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  1. #1 by CFrostyTheSnowman at December 19th, 2009

    It’s a treat till one of them dumps on your solar panel/head.

  2. #2 by lpgas1 at December 19th, 2009

    hi dan! i had one of these inverters on my house with 250 watts of panels here in australia. everything was working great until the power company found out about it and made me remove them or get a serious fine. they said i have to buy there grid tie kit which is 1kw and costs $12500.

  3. #3 by truckeejp at December 19th, 2009

    How long would it take to pay for it self?

  4. #4 by JULYINJULY at December 19th, 2009

    That sucks ass dude, how did they find out about it?

  5. #5 by Probewitch at December 19th, 2009

    Guess I missed something.
    What is the difference of a Grid-tie and a typical run your stuff , inverter?

  6. #6 by lpgas1 at December 19th, 2009

    i was at work and nothing in the house was on and the meter was running backwards!

  7. #7 by JULYINJULY at December 19th, 2009

    I think they have electronics inside different. I read that reg inverters will blow up.

  8. #8 by andruha11234 at December 19th, 2009

    can’t hear for shit….

  9. #9 by andruha11234 at December 19th, 2009

    @truckeejp 30 years

  10. #10 by pgm98387 at December 19th, 2009

    I like that you don’t need batteries!!

  11. #11 by cheeseboat15 at December 19th, 2009

    @andruha11234
    Not worth it….

  12. #12 by cheeseboat15 at December 19th, 2009

    Dan, I love your videos, however, this one kindof upset me. I just saw, first hand (no pun intended) how inefficient these cells are. Granted, they do work, but how long do you think it would take to recover all the energy used to make the system? (energy for refining copper, mining shipping, all that jazz)

    One viewer said 30 years for the cell to pay for itself. That sounds very unreasonable. Is this estimate true?

  13. #13 by jmincher3 at December 19th, 2009

    Obviously it will depend on the cost of grid power in your area, but for me (in Maine) energy costs are very high, so cost recovery will perhaps be faster than elsewhere… @25 yrs.

    However, I think this figure is overinflated. I based it on an quick online estimate I did last year to access the cost of going completely off grid—without any modifications to energy consumption. The system had a substantial buffer figured in (@30%+), included all inverters, & capacity for heat.

  14. #14 by jmincher3 at December 19th, 2009

    Come to think of it, the cost also included storage cells.

  15. #15 by DominickBlack at December 19th, 2009

    @cheeseboat15

    DUDE! GO ON EBAY AND DO THE MATH. THEY R RATED FOR 10 YEARS 100% AND THEN 80% FOR THE NEXT 20 YEARS.

    it WOULD COST ABOUT A THOUSAND DOLLARS TO MAKE ABOUT 12 PANELS SUCH AS THE ONE IN THIS VIDEO USING RECYCLES ITEMS TO MAKE THE FRAMES.

    TURN YOUR BRAIN ON, ALREADY. YOUR QUESTION IS IGNORANT. BE IGNORANT NO LONGER. PLEASE.

  16. #16 by egn83b at December 19th, 2009

    Nice

  17. #17 by cheeseboat15 at December 19th, 2009

    … although both terms are often used interchangeably. Only a very small portion of total power radiated from the sun reaches the Earth…. The average value of this constant (energy density of sunlight) is approximately 1361-1366 watts per square meter
    Don’t you dare for one second try to tell me any cell is 100% efficient.
    As for costs… Are you pulling the information out of your ass, cause I can assure you, you are off by quite a bit.

  18. #18 by truckeejp at December 19th, 2009

    What do you base your wisdom on? The panel cost $280 and he is putting what 63 watts back, power costs about 10 cents per Kilowatt, so thats less then a penny an hour, a hundred hours per dollar so maybe 30,000 hours to pay for the panel so about 3000 days at ten hours a day of sun if you are lucky. 8.2 years

  19. #19 by 1foxtrot70 at December 19th, 2009

    JulyInJuly – You are correct. The type of inverter required to push power into the grid is called a syncronous inverter. This type of inverter monitors and matches the sine wave produced to the sine wave of the grid. When they are in unison then power can be pushed into the grid otherwise a
    non-syncronous inverter will blow up can cause fire and other equipment i.e the solar panel or wind generator, etc can be damaged.

  20. #20 by andruha11234 at December 20th, 2009

    63 watts is 0.063 kilowatts… which means it takes 15.8 hours to make 1kilowatt which like you said is 10 cents…. do the rest of the math…

  21. #21 by McCreathBen at December 20th, 2009

    you used inncorrect grammer PSH sad…

  22. #22 by Ragrog105 at December 20th, 2009

    Dan, 5 stars (*****) but can you do something about the audio? Not only on this video, but virtually all of them. You are about 28 to 34 db lower than the average video posts.

  23. #23 by sjh7132 at December 20th, 2009

    Cool demo. But your logic saying that you aren’t losing any energy because the meters read the same is faulty. Even if you are losing energy, both meters will read the same. However you are still correct. If your cord is 18 gauge, you only have 1.5 ohms of resistance and a power loss of .4 watts.

  24. #24 by shreddlord at December 20th, 2009

    @andruha11234 it cant take 15.8 hours to make one kilowatt, because power is measured in energy per unit of time(watt=joules per second)

  25. #25 by brt5470 at December 20th, 2009

    I can assume this is because you’re not pushing 63 watts into the house, you’re letting it get pulled through. So the load would be the same.

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